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Posted On : 10 Sep, 2017  Source : PTI  Place : New Delhi 
I am careful about treatment of my Sufi songs in films: Rahman
With the use of Dervish dancers in "Khwaja Mere Khwaja" to Nizamuddin Dargah becoming the location for "Kun Faya Kun", Sufi songs by AR Rahman have always had the appropriate setting.

The music composer, who has been following the path of Sufisim for the past three decades, says he is always concerned about the way his songs are picturised and depicted in the movies.

In an interview with PTI, Rahman says, "Sufism is a special part of me. It is something through which I always like to combine professionalism and spiritualism. I always want to be as honest as possible with Sufi music.

"Specially when I make Sufi songs for movies, I am really careful about the treatment and depiction they get in the film. I always make it clear to the directors."

The Oscar-winning musician says the inappropriate treatment of holy songs in movies disturbs him a lot.

"At times the songs are done in a really bad way in movies. There are times when songs with holy names are playing in the background and people are shown getting murdered on screen. It disturbs me when I see anything like that."

Rahman, however, says he has been lucky as filmmakers respect his decision and value his inputs.

"There was a song 'Maula' in 'Ok Kanmani'. It was sung by my son. I was very concerned how it will be represented in the movie. But luckily people are very respectful and listen to what I say."

Rahman wants to promote Sufi music as much as possible and The Sufi Route concert for peace is his next step in that direction.

Organised by Friday Filmworks, INvision Entertainment and Invloed Matrix, the concert, scheduled to happen on November 18 at Qutub Minar, is an ode to Sufi music and poetry.

Sufi artistes such as Nooran sisters, Mukhtiar Ali, Hans Raj Hans, Konya Turkish Music Ensemble, Dhruv Sangari and Dervish dancers will be performing at the concert with Rahman headlining the finale.

"I am always happy to be a part of Sufi concerts. I believe there will never be bees if there is no honey. So, if there is no benefit from a particular genre of music, no one listens to that.

"The first Sufi concert I did was in Dubai and this is the second one. I want to do as much as possible for the upliftment of humanity. I want to use my music for spiritual the healing purpose and if it works I will be very happy," he says.
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